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May 10 2011

Eating Like You’re in Israel

By at 9:12 am

The fruit and vegetables are so fresh in Israel that I even like eating things like fennel and beets.

I’m no world traveler, but I have spent a fair amount of time in Israel. And it’s a pretty amazing country. From the history beneath your feet to the vistas of the desert to the food. Oh, the food. I spent a summer in Israel and went to the shuk (outdoor market) almost daily–buying fresh vegetables and fruits to eat for dinner that night, eating just-baked pita bread as I wandered through. I don’t think I’ve ever loved vegetables the way I do in Israel–they’re just so fresh, and once you’ve bargained with the guys at the shuk to get them down a shekel, you feel like a million bucks.

Today is Yom Ha’atzmaut, Israel Independence Day. It’s like our Fourth of July, but supposedly with a lot more Silly String involved. I’m not going to make it to Israel this year for the celebration, but in honor of Yom Ha’atzmaut, I’m going to make Israeli food like it’s going out of style. You can too–just check out these excellent recipes. Enjoy!

Baba Ganoush (a creamy, eggplant-based dip that goes great with pita bread or fresh vegetables)

Falafel You may want to break out the deep-fryer for this one, but oh man, these chickpea balls are delicious!

Hummus Kids love to eat it, and it’s easy to make too. Spread it on bread with some sprouts, tomato, and cucumber for a delicious and nutritious sandwich.

Israeli Breakfast Recipes In Israel, breakfast is filled with salads, vegetables, and dips–not at all like the carb-loaded breakfast here in the States. These healthier recipes will give your breakfast a whole new flavor.

Pita The flatbread of choice in Israel. You haven’t really tried it until you’ve tasted it hot from the oven. mmmmm.

Sabich Admittedly, I’ve never tried this sandwich. But with hummus, fried eggplant, Israeli salad, and hard-boiled eggs, how could you go wrong?

Schnitzel Basically a fried chicken cutlet. I like to eat them with ketchup.

Shakshuka consists of eggs poached in a thick tomato sauce. You’ve got to sop this one up with pita bread. (And if you don’t feel like cooking yourself, and if you’re lucky enough to live in Brooklyn, NY, like I am, you can have this made for you at this local restaurant.)

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