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Sep 13 2012

Rosh Hashanah Recipes: Chicken Soup (& Veggie Chicken Soup)

By at 9:45 am

chicken soup recipeToday’s Rosh Hashanah recipe of the day is quite the classic–chicken soup. Meredith Jacobs shares her recipe for the Jewish penicillin. But have no fear, vegetarians–we’ve also got a great recipe for vegetarian chicken soup from Leah Koenig that’s just as yummy.

Recipe for Chicken Soup:

My kids love this chicken soup. Why? Because I let the flavor of the chicken and vegetables infuse the broth creating a rich, velvety, and delicious soup. I make this every other week, freezing part of it use whenever we need it. My kids like it with matzah balls(of course) and they also like to eat the chicken shreds.

You’ll Need:

1 chicken (whole, but take out the junk inside)
2 turnips, cut into cubes
1 bag parnips cleaned, cut off ends, cut into chunks
6-8 stalks celery cleaned, cut into chunks
6-8 carrots cleaned, cut into chunks
3 yellow onions, cut and leave the skin on (it colors the soup)
1 bunch of dill
kosher salt, white pepper

1. Put everything EXCEPT THE DILL AND SEASONINGS into a large stockpot.  Put cold water over it, filling the pot full.

2. Bring to a boil, then simmer.

3. Simmer until the chicken is falling off the bone (about 2 to 3 hours).

4. Line a colander with paper towels or cheesecloth and put the colander over another stockpot.

5. Slowly pour the soup through it, changing the towels as necessary. You should, in the new stockpot, have a nice broth.

6. Bring the new broth up to a boil, then simmer another hour (this intensifies the flavor).

7. Float dill in it for 15 minutes and remove. Season with kosher salt and white pepper and serve.

Recipe for Vegetarian Chicken Soup:

Vegetarians need not feel left out. The recipe below maintains the golden hue and soothing warmth of regular chicken soup, but instead of oily schmaltz it gets its depth of flavor from long-simmered garlic and vegetables. The addition of lemongrass provides a hint of bright citrus fragrance, which adds a welcome complexity to the broth. It is a simple-to-make alternative for the vegetarians at the table, and a satisfying start to any dairy meal. And while the chicken-free version cannot claim to have exactly the same healing powers as the original, a steamy bowl on Friday night still does wonders for the body and the soul.

Serves 4-6.

2 Tablespoons olive oil
1 large onion, roughly chopped
2 large carrots, peeled and roughly chopped
2 large celery stalks (with leaves), roughly chopped
1 parsnip, peeled and roughly chopped
5 large garlic cloves, smashed
1 leek, cleaned well and roughly chopped
9 cups water
2 bay leaves
A handful of flat-leaf parsley, roughly chopped
1 stalk lemongrass, split into four small pieces
2 Tablespoons coarse kosher salt (or to taste)

In a large stockpot, heat oil and sauté onions for about 5 minutes over medium heat. Add carrots, celery, parsnip, garlic, and leeks and sauté for another 3 minutes, until fragrant. Add water and bay leaves and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and let simmer for about one hour uncovered.

After one hour, add lemongrass, parsley, and salt, and simmer for another thirty minutes. Let soup cool a bit, then strain into a large bowl using a cheesecloth or mesh strainer. If desired, add some of the vegetables back (discard the rest). Serve hot as is or with matzah balls, noodles, kreplach, etc.

Check out more Rosh Hashanah recipes here.

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