Search
Follow Kveller

You are browsing the archive for divorce.

Aug 20 2013

Zombies, Calculators & More Back to School Fun with Mayim Bialik

By at 12:05 pm

abc on the red carpet mayim bialikI just wrapped up the Back to School campaign I do with Texas Instruments and I thought I would share some highlights.

The campaign this year is called “STEM Behind Hollywood” and what we did was we took concepts and ideas kids already see and know and love in Hollywood (zombies, superheroes, space, and forensics) to get them excited about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). Stemhollywood.com is the website for our campaign and we have free (free!) downloadable activities for the TI-Nspire CX graphing calculator as well as iPad apps that explain the real science and math behind these Hollywood concepts.

Starting with zombies, I got to meet and work with Dr. Steve Schlozman, author of The Zombie Autopsies: Secret Notes from the Apocalypse. Dr. Steve is actually a child psychiatrist but since he was a kid he has loved zombies. He wrote this fascinating fictional book about what it would be like for an actual doctor to study and analyze zombies and now they are turning his book into a movie. Read the rest of this entry →

Jun 27 2013

How Mayim Bialik–Actress, Writer & Mother of Two–Does It

By at 1:48 pm

mayim bialik at emmys 2012

Ever wonder how other parents handle (or try to handle) the day-to-day grind of raising young kids? We were, which is why we started the “How She Does It” series to shed light on how mothers do it–from wake-up to bedtime and everything in between.

I don’t work in the summer the way most moms and dads do. I work on The Big Bang Theory August through April and in between, I do speaking engagements, Texas Instruments events, and other random weird work stuff. But I don’t want to be left out of the “How Do I Do It?” series…

So here’s an average day in the summer with my kids. Uncensored.

6:45 a.m. Fred (almost 5) wakes up first and starts sleepily tickling my arms, honing in with his razor-fine fingernails on every imperfection in my skin, making me yelp and cringe. Miles (almost 8) wakes up to cuddle the other side of me. (They have started sleeping in their own sibling bed this summer, but since they had been with their dad for a week, they requested sleeping with me again and I obliged willingly.) Read the rest of this entry →

Jun 24 2013

How Many Shabbat Candles Does a Divorced Woman Light?

By at 12:04 pm

Mayim Bialik sag awards 2013This post is the last entry in Mayim’s month-long series about the Jewish aspects of divorce.

As a child, I lit two Shabbat candles with my mother every time she lit Shabbat candles. I felt like a little Ima (mother), like they make you pretend in preschool or kindergarten Hebrew school. It’s practice, you know. For when you are a “real” Ima. Imas light two candles.

When I got married, I had not been consistently lighting Shabbat candles for years. After leaving my parents’ home and going to college, I stopped, but I would light them with the other girls at Hillel when I attended services there and looked forward to a day when I would light them as a married woman.  Read the rest of this entry →

Jun 18 2013

Since My Divorce, I’m Missing the Mikveh

By at 1:17 pm

mayim bialik divorce series mikvehThis post is part of Mayim’s month-long series about the Jewish aspects of divorce.

I didn’t grow up knowing anything about the mikveh, the ritual bath religious women enter before their wedding and each month after their menstrual cycle ends. When I learned about it as a teenager, it sounded gross. It sounded like women were treated horribly there, and it sounded like Judaism thought I was dirty and it did not appeal to me at all.

As I increased my Jewish learning at UCLA and specifically through UCLA Hillel, I learned that there were movements of women who were “taking back” mikveh as a transformative and mystical experience. Women who, after divorce or cancer treatment or miscarriage or abortion, were entering the sacred waters to rejuvenate and start again. They were liberating the experience from halachic restrictions and were making a new world of mikveh open to all women. It was beautiful, I thought.   Read the rest of this entry →

Jun 12 2013

The Jewish Divorce: Getting a Get with Mayim Bialik

By at 12:26 pm

mayim bialik writes about jewish divorce ghetThis post is part of Mayim’s month-long series about the Jewish aspects of divorce.

As a woman who is observant-ish and has led an observant lifestyle, divorce presents some very interesting challenges. I don’t know that I am yet ready to present my personal decisions about some of these challenges, but I wanted to share what the challenges are in hopes that other women might find them helpful.

Jewish weddings are held in a religious ceremony that has its own set of laws and rituals. A Jewish wedding is sealed with a ketubah, a marriage contract ensuring protection for the woman in case of mistreatment, neglect, or refusal of rights, such as–not kidding–the right to be sexually satisfied by your husband. Judaism is one of the first religions producing a document (thousands of years ago, mind you) that held the woman’s rights in any esteem, so it’s a very big deal. Read the rest of this entry →

Jun 7 2013

Going Through a Divorce in Public & Private

By at 9:52 am

Mayim Bialik sag awards 2013The last post I wrote about head-covering after divorce was the first in a four-part series of posts I have written about Jewish aspects of divorce.

My goal with these posts is to be educational without being excessively emotional; I am told that I am an emotional writer and so it’s hard to separate those. As a writer and public person, I don’t share “everything” and I choose very carefully what to share, always trying to think of my motive. Do I share things just because I can? Or can my writing serve a purpose which is not strictly narcissistic!?

I hope that these divorce posts will accomplish two things. First, I hope they educate people about aspects of divorce in the Jewish community they may not have heard about or thought about. I love that we have Jewish and non-Jewish readers on Kveller who like to learn about how other people live religiously. It’s wonderful for us to have this forum to share. And second, I hope to give support to women who may be similarly struggling with some of the more subtle aspects of divorce by talking about the uncomfortable and inevitable decisions that often come with being traditional in a nontraditional situation.

In other news, I am doing great. I am not a sad sack of potatoes, at least not all of the time. My boys are doing great, their dad is doing great. We are okay. The struggles I am sharing are struggles that I hope have universal aspects to them, but I am working through all of it with support of friends and a great therapist and lots of nourishing myself with time for music and art and adjusting.

I appreciate the virtual support I get from everyone who knows me from Kveller and in the media, and I also appreciate the privacy being given to me and my family that is so important in this transitional time.

Shabbat Shalom!

Love Mayim? Get her latest blog posts delivered straight to your inbox.

Jun 4 2013

Since My Divorce, What Do I Do About Covering My Head?

By at 1:51 pm
mayim bialik crocheted kippah

My crocheted kippah.

This is the first in a month-long series of posts Mayim will be writing about the Jewish aspects of divorce. Up first: head coverings.

I was raised in a traditional Jewish household attending a Reform synagogue. My mother was raised Orthodox but left traditional Judaism pretty much as soon as she could.

When we lit Shabbat candles, my mother covered her head with a doily and I had a matching one so I could be like her.

My mom’s older sister was very religious,  so she and all of her daughters covered their heads all the time in tichels (headscarves), hats, and, for special occasions, fancy wigs. To me, head coverings were for super religious people. I had no problem wearing a small kippah sometimes when making blessings as a child, and one of my cousins in Israel even crocheted me one with my name on it which I treasured and still have and treasure. I saw nothing strange about women wearing kippahs, since in Reform and Conservative circles, it was acceptable. Why not?  Read the rest of this entry →

Apr 29 2013

Maintaining Faith Throughout the Harder Times of Life

By at 1:48 pm

under construction signI know that I have so much to be grateful for, and I am. I live in a country of democratic ideals (even though it’s not perfect), I have a roof over my head, money for food and clothing and medicine, I am in fairly good health, I am employed, I have friends and family who love me.

I’ve talked a lot here on Kveller about my religious faith, even in the face of my horrible car accident, and even in the face of doubt and fear. And I think I have realized that it is that sense of faith that helps me get through my moments/hours/days/weeks/months of despair. Read the rest of this entry →

Mar 29 2013

Mayim Bialik’s Seder Recap

By at 1:23 pm

matzah piecePesach was good! Mid-divorce, I hosted everyone. And it was great.

In addition to my I-still-call-her-my-mother-in-law and Michael, my parents were there and my uncle. My closest and oldest friend and her 7-year-old daughter came and the kids had a blast. Her 7-year-old and my 7-year-old even let my 4-year-old find the afikomen because he was literally having a fit about the possibility of not finding it, starting at about karpas. Thank you, mature 7-year-olds!  Read the rest of this entry →

Mar 19 2013

Five Ways I’m Doing Passover Differently This Year

By at 1:21 pm

stack of paper platesPassover is upon us and I am sort of almost ready. Because of my car accident seven and a half months ago and my tendinitis which I am just finally over, my cleaning and cooking will not be as thorough and rigorous as I like them to be, but I am doing things differently this year and that’s a good thing.

Here are the things I am doing differently:

1. Not obsessing as much as I like to. Traditional Judaism is a beloved religious undertaking for those of us on the Obsessive-Compulsive spectrum, with its myriad boundaries, numerical rituals, and things to do and not do in order to be “right” with God and the world. Even our spring cleaning is regimented, to a certain extent, and I usually take this time of year to go totally nutso bonkers with my cleaning. This year, it will be more by-the-books and I will save the super duper magnifying glass-type of scouring for another time when my hand is better. And that’s ok.  Read the rest of this entry →

About Mayim

Mayim Bialik is the grandchild of immigrants from Eastern Europe and the mother of two young boys. She is best known for her lead role in the 1990s NBC sitcom Blossom, as well as her current role as Amy Farrah Fowler on CBS' The Big Bang Theory.

Recently on Kveller

Tags