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Abortion

Indiana Is Trying to Force Abortion Providers To Give Women False Information

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An Indiana House panel approved an amended version of a bill that would require abortion providers to give women considering medical (pill-induced) abortions information on stopping the procedure midway through — after one of two pills. This is kind of awful, considering that said “reversal” process is both scientifically disputed and potentially harmful. The bill will go to the House floor for debate.

This misogynist bill arrives thanks to Republican Rep. Ron Bacon. Bacon’s proposal would require the State Health Department to create a form with information on the so-called reversal option, which would also include a disclaimer that no “scientifically validated medical study” confirms it’s viable or safe — which is exactly why critics oppose his legislation.

It’s frightening to think Bacon, and anyone who supports this idea, doesn’t seem to think it’s wrong to allow women to undergo a potentially dangerous (or plain unnecessary) procedure. Basically, they’re willing to experiment on women for the sake of making a point. The measure passed Tuesday in a 7-6 vote, after some changes that critics demanded such as removing the requirement that abortion doctors to use a dating ultrasound on patients. Still, the two Republicans on the panel who voted against the measure, Reps. Edward Clere and Sean Eberhart, were unconvinced. Their statement seems pretty smart, safe and ethical:

“We don’t direct any other health care provider to distribute information that lacks an established basis in science or doesn’t meet a peer-reviewed research standard.”

Earlier this month in North Carolina, an eerily similar “abortion reversal” measure was introduced — which is no surprise, because anti-abortion legislation often moves from state to state, whether or not it derives from templates created by bigger national groups.

Why do people seem to hate women so much?

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