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Dec 13 2010

Newsflash: College is a Good Time to Meet a Boy

By at 5:19 pm

The Washington Post has a mediocre article about multi-racial Jewish adoptions. Personally, I think this story is about five years old. If you are shocked by interracial Jewish families now, whether they are the result of adoption or not, you have been living under a rock. (Sorry, I’m judgy.) But the thing that really annoyed me about this article was the following:

Oh my gosh! I forgot to get pregnant!

In Jewish families, it’s “education, education, education,” said Suissa, who lives in the District. “But nobody told me that college might be a good time to meet a nice Jewish boy.”

Seriously? You were waiting for someone to tell you to meet a boy? And you were in college, surrounded by boys who were probably constantly playing Ultimate Frisbee, and wearing rugby shirts, and looking all adorable, and it never occurred to you that it might be fun to date one of these guys? I…am confused.

I get that women feel conflicted between wanting to get ahead with their careers and wanting to have babies. That makes total sense and is a sentiment I share(ish). But I do not think that we should be saying there isn’t enough pressure on Jewish women to make babies. (Actual question my Bubbe asked me this summer: “Tamar, why aren’t you pregnant?” Note that I’m not married.) If Jewish ladies aren’t having kids, it’s not because they forgot, or no one thought to mention to them that they should procreate. Maybe they put careers first and then found out they couldn’t get pregnant. That is, I’m sure, devastating. But this is from an article about how awesome inter-racial Jewish adoption is.  So maybe lay off the guilt tripping Jewish women into getting pregnant yesterday, okay?


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