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Jun 15 2012

Stories of Our Fathers: The Namer & The Teacher

By at 2:06 pm

birth certicateAll this week, we’re featuringstories of great fathers collected by the Jewish Women’s Archive in honor of Father’s Day. We’ll be featuring the last two today. This first one is from Preeva Tramiel:

My father chose my name, and that cemented my connection to Judaism. He named me after his mother, Pruva, who died in Auschwitz. The “American” version of my name is Preeva, and it is on my birth certificate. Daddy took to me shul on Friday nights, and we came early so he could talk to his friends and show me off a little. He would say, “Preeva, explain your name.” And I would straighten my dress, and recite: “When God created man, on the sixth day he said to him, Pru U’Rvu Ee melu et ha’aretz, be fruitful and multiply and develop the earth. From that comes Pruva, which we pronounce here in America, Preeva.”

He set an example for me by putting on tefillin every morning before work, even when he worked on Saturday. He also took me to the Wailing Wall in 1968 and blessed me there. Unfortunately, he died when I was 16, but I turned out well. I was just named president of Etz Chayim, an independent liberal synagogue in Palo Alto, and I am working on a book about the facts of his life.

And from Sue Kelman:

My Jewish father is the one who has always taught me how to use his tools, many of which he has gifted to me, how to fix things, and how to make homemade horseradish. I know he is preparing me for the day when he is no longer with me and I love him for this. At age 91, his life is a blessing to me and I am grateful for every bit of wisdom he imparts to me, his oldest daughter.

To read more, head on over to JWA’s blog, Jewesses with Attitude.

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Kveller Poetry Corner: From Father to Son
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